issue 11.1: July 2005

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REVIEW: Dale Lloyd online

reviewed by: Josh Russell
More and more I am finding online releases that are definitely worth the time it takes to download them. Dale Lloyd’s “lateral minor” and “turba” series release on the consistently excellent three-year-old weblabel http://www.stasisfield.com which is one of the most intriguing works that I had the pleasure to come across in 2004.
Listening at different volumes and under various conditions will change any work but with Dale Lloyd’s sounds, like Bernhard Günter’s, it seems the question of listening conditions is central to the realization of the aesthetic intent. The material of both artists requires one to prepare for and commit to listening uninterruptedly for the duration of the work. Otherwise there simply isn’t any point. What are the correct circumstances for allowing the full intent of artist to be perceived? After some thinking on this issue I decided that in order to get the full frequency range of the composition the playback system must be set so that lowest frequencies can be perceived.
With “lateral minor” Lloyd gives up a good piece to test the listening level as it starts out with a low frequency drone. After turning up the volume so I could hear all the details in the low-end some high-end frequencies came piercing through making it easy to decide not to go any louder. That set, I then stopped the music, took a break, closed the windows, unplugged the fridge, turned off the heater and settled in to listening at the optimized volume uninterrupted for the duration of the works, twice.
The headphone listen revealed a rich stereo field teaming with activity while the studio monitor listen brought out the organic physicality of the sounds. His craft is refined, a product of pursuing his sound aesthetic for over 10 years. It’s clear a sensitive ear put the sounds together. Even the smallest of nuances arrives weighted by intention. It seems he uses field recordings not as sound objects themselves but more as a set of variables to extract a new world from, to be mined for their transformable/interpretable qualities. A good example of this alchemic interpretation of sounds is the last 90 seconds or so on “lateral minor” which ends with a haunting musical drone molded out of various contact microphone recordings of a glass elevator. I only know that because I asked. The pacing keeps things flowing with “movements” of between two and 4 minutes throughout. The hyper-synthetic sounds work are imbued with a certain “presence” that feels (yes “feels” not “sounds”) natural. An impressive aspect of the work is how convincing the inner logic of Lloyd’s sonic phenomena is. The audio’s patterns and pacing implicitly make sense. Although the sounds are varied they clearly inhabit the same world and seem to intuitively obey complex interaction parameters.
I asked Dale Lloyd about his aesthetic to which he replied.
“I tend to mostly be drawn to working and creating sounds that either remind me of naturally occurring sonic phenomena which can be found somewhere in nature/science, or that sonically remind me of processes, movements, patterns, activities, etc. that one might find when exploring nature/science.”
Of course!
To keep up with Lloyd’s activities visit his website http://www.and-oar.org/dalelloyd.html
some recommended places to download net-releases:
www.con-v.org
www.stasisfield.com
http://www.monocromatica.com/netlabel
if you want more you can go take a look at the list here http://www.earlabs.org/releases/netlabelspec.asp
>>Josh Russell is a sound artist living in Austin, Texas. He runs Bremsstrahlung Recordings>>

 

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